Free advice is also available on a number of Usenet news groups (such as comp.os.linux.networking). 6.2 Subnetwork sizing There is a play off between the number of subnetworks you create and 'wasted' IP numbers.

How the ip Command Works. With the ip command, you can adjust the way a Linux computer handles IP addresses, network interfaces controllers (NICs), and routing rules.The changes also take immediate effect—you don't have to reboot. The ip command can do a lot more than this, but we'll focus on the most common uses in this article.. The ip command has many subcommands, each of which works Linux Network Configuration and Troubleshooting Commands 1. ifconfig. ifconfig (interface configurator) command is use to initialize an interface, assign IP Address to interface and enable or disable interface on demand. With this command you can view IP Address and Hardware / MAC address assign to interface and also MTU (Maximum transmission unit) size. Method #2: Network configuration using the GUI. You can set an IP address via the graphical user interface in Ubuntu. From the desktop, click on the start menu and search for Settings.From the Settings window, click on the Network tab.Then from the right pane, select the interface and click on the gear icon to open settings for that interface. iproute2 is a collection of utilities for controlling TCP and UDP IP networking and traffic control in Linux, in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. iproute2 is intended to replace an entire suite of standard Unix networking tools (often called "net-tools") that were previously used for the tasks of configuring network interfaces, routing tables Linux Network Configuration Networking, set-up and administration. This Linux tutorial covers TCP/IP networking, network administration and system configuration basics. Linux can support multiple network devices. The device names are numbered and begin at zero and count upwards.

Section 3: Brief howto using MULTIQ for multiqueue devices¶ The userspace command ‘tc,’ part of the iproute2 package, is used to configure qdiscs. To add the MULTIQ qdisc to your network device, assuming the device is called eth0, run the following command:

NET3-4-HOWTO, Linux Networking HOWTO. Updated: Aug 1999. Aims to describe how to install and configure the Linux networking software and associated tools. ADSL-Bandwidth-Management-HOWTO, ADSL Bandwidth Management HOWTO. Updated: Apr 2003. Describes how to configure a linux router to more effectively manage outbound traffic on an ADSL modem. Linux Networking−HOWTO: Author: Joshua Drake poet@linuxports.com v1.6.2, December 1999 A www.linuxports.com document for the Linux Documentation Project 1.Introduction. 2.Document History • 2.1 Feedback 3.How to use this HOWTO. • 3.1 Conventions used in this document 4.General Information about Linux Networking. • 4.1 Linux Networking

Linux Networking−HOWTO: Author: Joshua Drake poet@linuxports.com v1.6.2, December 1999 A www.linuxports.com document for the Linux Documentation Project 1.Introduction. 2.Document History • 2.1 Feedback 3.How to use this HOWTO. • 3.1 Conventions used in this document 4.General Information about Linux Networking. • 4.1 Linux Networking

How to Set up a Wireless Network in Linux. A walkthrough of wireless (IEEE 802.11 also known as WiFi) home networking with Linux. Most wireless adapters are not designed for use in Linux and depend on non-free proprietary drivers and Networking includes network configuration and troubleshooting. In this module, we are learning about the Linux networking commands and network troubleshooting. Linux Networking Commands. Linux networking commands are used extensively to inspect, analyze, maintain and troubleshoot the network/s connected to the system. This video will show you how to change your host name and enable the DHCP client. Introduction. Arch Linux will, in most cases, automatically configure a network connection for the Live Installation Image. However, once the operating system has been installed on the system, networking has to be manually enabled. This creates the final entry shown by netstat and tells Linux to route all packets not destined for the 192.168.10. network or the loopback network to the defined gateway, in this case 192.168.10.1.